Beyond-use dates for CSPs are rarely based on preparation-specific chemical assay results, which are used with the Arrhenius equation to determine expiration dates see General Notices and Requirements for manufactured products. The majority of CSPs are aqueous solutions in which hydrolysis of dissolved ingredients is the most common chemical degradation reaction. The extent of hydrolysis and other heat-catalyzed degradation reactions at any particular time point in the life of a CSP represents the thermodynamic sum of exposure temperatures and durations. Such lifetime stability exposure is represented in the mean kinetic temperature calculation see Pharmaceutical Calculations in Prescription Compounding Drug hydrolysis rates increase exponentially with arithmetic temperature increase; thus, exposure of a beta-lactam antibiotic solution for one day at controlled room temperature see General Notices and Requirements will have an equivalent effect on the extent of hydrolysis of approximately 3 to 5 days in cold temperatures see General Notices and Requirements. Personnel who prepare, dispense, and administer CSPs must store them strictly in accordance with the conditions stated on the label of ingredient products and finished CSPs. When CSPs are known to have been exposed to temperatures warmer than the warmest labeled limit, but not exceeding 40 see General Notices and Requirements for more than 4 hours, such CSPs should be discarded, unless appropriate documentation or direct assay data confirms their continued stability. Determining Beyond-Use Dates. When CSPs deviate from conditions in the approved labeling of manufactured products contained in CSPs, compounding personnel may consult the manufacturer of particular products for advice on assigning beyond-use dates based on chemical and physical stability parameters. Beyond-use dates for CSPs that are prepared strictly in accordance with manufacturers’ product labeling must be those specified in that labeling, or from appropriate literature sources or direct testing.

Using a Pharmacy Glove Box for Compounding Sterile Preparations

Featured Issue Featured Supplements. Subscribe Jobs. The USP Chapter was introduced in to provide regulation to pharmacies on quality standards for compounding sterile products CSPs. USP was subsequently introduced in , with an implementation date of December

Aligning with USP and PCAB standards for sterile compounding based on USP and proposed chapter 17 beyond-use dating.

The most recent revisions implement new standards and revise existing ones based on recent scientific and technological developments. Significant changes include:. In light of the new standards, pharmacies should evaluate the physical capabilities of their compounding facilities to ensure they can meet the demands of the revised requirements. With states increasingly requiring that licensees adhere to the USP standards, state Boards of Pharmacy are likely to adopt these or similar changes in the near future.

In addition, providers may need to train employees to work within a controlled environment that conforms to the new USP standards. The revised chapter instead focuses on standards aimed at ensuring the integrity of CSPs. With this modified scope, the June 1 st revisions set forth stringent controls on the compounding environment in which compounding activities occur. Category 1 CSPs generally have a shorter beyond-use date and can be prepared in an unclassified segregated compounding area.

In contrast, Category 2 CSPs generally have a longer beyond-use date and must be prepared in a cleanroom suite.

USP Finalizes Revisions to Sterile Compounding Standards

A beyond-use date is a date placed on a prescription by a pharmacy for compounded medications they prepare, noting when that prescription should no longer be used. This date is determined by the pharmacy when they prepare a compound prescription based on different factors, including:. The beyond-use date is different than an expiration date of a drug. This includes moving a medication to a different container, which is the normal practice for pharmacies dispensing prescriptions.

Based on the type of drug, how fast it degrades, dosage, type of container, storage conditions, prescription length, the likelihood of contamination. Based on testing a drug in specific conditions related to storage containers, lighting, temperature, etc.

The revisions to USP reflect new science and evidence based on updated operational changes, new storage requirements, and new handling measures. Category 1 CSPs have a shorter beyond-use date and can be.

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Look for New Risk Categories and Beyond-Use Dates With USP 797

The compounding of medications is a fundamental part of pharmacy practice. All compounding personnel, mainly pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, are responsible for compounding and dispensing sterile products and preparations of correct ingredient identity, purity freedom from physical contaminants, such as precipitates, 1 and chemical contaminants , strength including stability 2 and compatibility , and sterility and for dispensing them in appropriate containers that are labeled accurately and appropriately for the end user.

In contemporary health care organizations, patients receive compounded sterile preparations CSPs that are stored for extended periods before use. It has long been recognized that extended storage of CSPs may allow for the growth of a pathological bioburden of microorganisms 3 and that patient morbidity and mortality can result from contaminated or incorrectly compounded sterile preparations.

beyond use date. ➢ See record keeping section for documentation requirements. Technology/Automation Used for Compounding CSPs. • Organizations.

The proposed chapter was open to public comments until November 30, , and is expected to become official on December 1, The proposed revision differs from the current chapter in both its structure and its content. Some of the changes are significant and will require major adjustments in pharmacy systems and processes, while other changes will be easier to accommodate. Here is a summary of some of the changes. The current chapter classifies compounded sterile preparations CSPs as low-, medium-, or high-risk level CSPs based on the sterility of the starting components and the number and types of compounding manipulations.

The proposed chapter, however, eliminates this system of classifications and instead classifies sterile preparations as either a category 1 or category 2 CSP based on the conditions under which the product was prepared. The proposed chapter also changes the system for assigning beyond-use dates to CSPs. Instead of assigning a maximum allowable BUD based on the risk level of the preparation, the proposed chapter follows a new system for assigning BUDs based on several different factors related to achieving and maintaining sterility.

The proposed guidelines allow a longer BUD for category 2 CSPs, especially those that are terminally sterilized, prepared using only sterile components, tested for sterility, or stored in refrigerated or frozen storage conditions. Table 12 from the proposed chapter summarizes these requirements.

Three concepts that create a lot of confusion: stability, beyond-use date, expiration

Email address:. Beyond use dating is the expiration date of quizlet. Generally, and beyond use, use the domestication of quality preparations. This dates of quality preparations.

What is the difference between expiration date and. Beyond Use Dating (BUD)?. • What are the criteria and guidelines for immediate use.

Each year, the questions take on common themes and was no exception. Some of the questions were repeated in each of the six minute roundtable slots. In the interest of sharing this experience with all those who could not get to this roundtable there were many other topics and with those colleagues unable to make it to the conference, I have summarized some of the main areas of discussion brought forth by participants.

Nowobilski-Vasilios and I both thank the many participants at least 60 over the two days who joined this roundtable, and who took the time to write their questions out on note cards so we could produce this summary. Here are the most common and key points of the discussion. Risk levels: How does one go about deciding what is appropriate?

These three related questions came up more than once during the roundtable sessions at the NHIA Conference, so I will address them all with one rather long commentary and suggested approach. Policies and procedures may not always address every situation, requiring professional judgment. Risk level determination is up to the individual pharmacist or pharmacy management’s “clinical exception process” when patient needs and practice standards seem to conflict.

It can also be a valuable tool to support professional judgment decisions when patient care needs conflict with the overall guidelines for risk levels and BUD. Using this decision tree, let’s evaluate a realistic risk level for an elastomeric device prepared under full compliance with all other low-and medium-risk requirements and quality standards.

Infusion – July/August 2017

The system that most pharmacies use to assign a date beyond which it should no longer be used seems to be a point of confusion. We, myself included, historically have given day beyond use dating to our products without a second thought and no real scientific data to back up that claim. Seems the revised BUD guidance gives some credence to preservatives, sterilization methods, etc, but with a maximum BUD of 45 days.

Good practice is note the date first entered on the label. “The standards in this chapter (USP ) do not pertain to the clinical administration of CSPs .

Chapter in Pharmaceutical Compounding — Sterile Preparations issued by the US Pharmacopeia describes the guidelines, procedures and compliance requirements for compounding sterile preparations and sets the standards that apply to all settings in which sterile preparations are compounded. The clean room must include an attached anteroom at the same air quality level ISO Class 8 for movement of personnel and materials in and out of the clean room.

Building and operating a clean room can be an expensive and time-consuming proposition. Fortunately, pharmacies can also comply with requirements using a barrier isolator, also known as a glovebox. A glovebox isolator or barrier isolator provides a physical barrier between pharmacy personnel and the compounding activity. Traditional clean benches and biosafety cabinets have an open front access area, where there is the possibility that disruptions in the room airflow or poor aseptic technique by the operator will introduce contaminants to the work area.

Sterile IV Compounding Proper Garbing and Hand Hygiene USP 797